Where to find a good Tutor for my Teenager who is Struggling?


Tutor
High school can be a difficult time for teens, not only emotionally, but academically as well. The competition is fierce, and expectations are high. Parents want their children to attend college after high school, and getting there can be a challenging journey. The stress of maintaining a strong grade point average, and preparing for and taking SATs (College Board Official SAT Study Guide on Amazon), can cause a student enormous turmoil, and often the anxiety that envelops some kids can result in a total shut-down in motivation, performance, and confidence. The answer can be as simple as getting a good tutor for your child, who can provide not only the academic support, but also the emotional encouragement he or she needs to survive the high school years.

Some children don't have the advantages of others for many reasons. Many students, although intelligent enough, may lack solid study skills, support from teachers, or simply suffer from test anxiety. Whatever the reason a child is having trouble making the grades needed to interest the colleges, obtaining a tutor can be one of the best investments you can ever make to prepare and secure your offspring for his future.

Tutors are everywhere. That can be good and that can be bad. Unlike teachers, a tutor does not need to be certified to work with students. So when searching for a qualified tutor, there are several options that can help you find the perfect one. First, you must consider your budget. If you are not prepared to spend a great deal of money, a good option is to check out the local college information boards for students offering tutoring services. College students are always looking for ways to earn a little bit of extra cash, and they usually charge very agreeable rates. When interviewing a college student as a potential tutor, remember to ask questions such as what his or her focus of study is, their current grades, and inquire about any previous experience they may have.

Always, always ask for and check references! One of the benefits to hiring a college student to tutor your teenager is the potential for bonding. Because the tutor and the student are close in age, there is a good opportunity for relatability and understanding. And for more rebellious teens experiencing issues with authority, working with a person who is only several years older than he is, can help the child feel more comfortable, and therefore be more motivated to work harder, as well as feel the need to impress this almost-peer.

Another option is to enroll your child in a reputable tutoring center. These centers personalize instruction to the student's needs, and teach organization skills, time management strategies, as well as core academic instruction. And you are assured the instructors are certified with at least several years of experience teaching children. The disadvantage to this option is the cost. But most tutoring centers offer a flexible payment plan to ease the burden (what private tutors charge in the UK?).

Online tutoring is another route to take, but keep in mind that this option should only be used by students who can self-discipline, have strong focus skills, and can work independently without an adult having to oversee the progress. This tutoring choice can be very beneficial for those teens requiring just a little bit of extra reinforcement with certain skills, and provides consistent extra practice on those skills until a student masters them. If a teen is truly struggling with a lot of academic skills, and his confidence and motivation are low, this tutoring option is absolutely not going to be beneficial. Lot of teachers are getting registered to become a teacher online. This shows online teaching does work and people are taking interest.

Finally, message boards such as Craigslist are loaded with teachers, former teachers, and others seeking tutoring jobs to supplement their incomes. This is a terrific way to find a solid, reliable and qualified tutor. Again, be certain to ask rigorous interview questions, and request references. Always meet any tutor you hire before you introduce him or her to your child. And it is recommended that once you hire a tutor, you have him meet your teen in a casual, relaxed environment so the two can begin to get to know each other, without the pressure of academic instruction. This can build trust and result in your teen feeling like a real person rather than simply a failure that needs help. A good tutor will NEVER make your child feel inadequate or stupid.

It will probably take about 3 sessions before you can know that the tutor/student relationship is compatible and successful. If you notice your child is irritable or depressed after a session, talk to him about why. If he doesn't like, or trust the tutor, or if the tutor is not encouraging, motivating and positive during their sessions, then consider moving on to someone else. It actually may take several tries until you hit the jackpot with the perfect tutor for your child, and you will know this when you see a change in attitude, grades going up, and confidence sprouting.

Always remind your teen that having a tutor will remain confidential if he isn't comfortable, or is embarrassed, with friends knowing. And of course, let him know that needing a little help does not mean he is not smart or capable. Make sure he realizes that you are incredibly proud and excited that he values his education. Kids who make sacrifices are usually the ones who grow up to be whatever they decide they want to be.

Recommended Resources

Check this book on amazon : How to Tutor Your Own Child: Boost Grades and Inspire a Lifelong Love of Learning--Without Paying for a Professional Tutor. Top professional tutor Marina Koestler Ruben empowers you to take a do-it-yourself approach to your child's after-school enrichment.

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Edited by: Rajesh Bihani ( Find me on Google+ )

Disclaimer: The suggestions in the article(wherever applicable) are for informational purposes only. They are not intended as medical or any other type of advice